In KC, Dance the Night Away October 18

Our colleagues in Kansas City will host a Regency ball October 18 in conjunction with the Midwest American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies.  See below for complete information.


 

Registration open!
regency-ball-dancing-JASNA-St-Louis
Jane Austen Regency Ball
Saturday, October 18
7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
The Aladdin Hotel Ballroom
1215 Wyandotte St.
Kansas City, MO

$12 per person in advance or at the door

Details at http://jasnakc.org/jane-austen-regency-ball.html
Register by email to Leah Wilson at ljpww@hotmail.com

Spend the Day in the 18th Century!

Dance attendees may purchase a $25 non-participant day pass
to attend Saturday’s academic panels offered
by The Midwest American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies.
Select from a variety of topics throughout the day,
including an Austen-specific panel at 3:45.
Check the conference website for details on or before September 1
and consider adding this enjoyment to your dance registration.

Julienne Gehrer

JASNA StL News & Notes – August 2014

 

JASNA StL founding member Phyllis Thorpe recently passed along two links of interest to readers of Jane Austen.

The first: a link to a July 6 “Charlie Rose” conversation with John McQuillen, the curator of the Morgan Library’s current “Marks of Genius” exhibit. The interviewer is guest host Jon Meacham, whose favorite author, it turns out, is Miss Austen. (If you want to skip the political talk, however interesting, that precedes the interview with Mr. McQuillen, scroll to near the end of the program.)

http://www.charlierose.com/watch/60414985

The second: an article in the current issue of the Atlantic, “The Economics of Jane Austen” by Shannon Chamberlain, who discusses the influence Adam Smith may have had on Jane Austen’s views on money and morality. Interesting, to say the least.

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/08/the-economics-of-jane-austen/375486

 

Notes from our New York Colleagues

In addition to Phyllis’ correspondence, our New York colleagues Linda Dennery and Meg Levin passed along the following recently:

For the last three months, Sarah Emsley’s blog has been offering guests the chance to discuss Mansfield Park, Jane Austen’s third novel, which was published in 1814 and is the theme of this year’s JASNA AGM. Authors include Elaine Bander, Cheryl Kinney, Juliet McMaster, Sarah Seltzer and Juliette Wells. Go here to read the latest one and scroll down the page for earlier posts, beginning May 9: sarahemsley.

If you’re not familiar with W.H. Auden’s poem in which he feigns shock at how Jane Austen could “Reveal so frankly and with such sobriety/The Economic basis of society,” you can find the poem and the views of other famous authors on the following page: here.

The Jane Austen Centre in Bath has unveiled a new waxwork figure of Jane Austen, based on contemporary descriptions and the sketch by her sister Cassandra. Go here to view a video of how it was made: Wax Jane.

 


 

Seventh Annual Louisville Jane Austen Festival July 18–20

Tea, Workshops, a Regency Dress Record, and More Tea: A Delightful Weekend in Louisville

By Mayme Bolt, Metropolitan St. Louis Region

Despite a little drizzle on Friday night, July 18, there was Twilight Shopping, which proved a lot of fun. Traditional Kentucky food was served, and the anniversary of Jane Austen’s death was observed with the playing of music from the Regency period. The tea company, Bingley’s Tea, was there, and the first 25 people who bought tea received a free tote bag. Yes, I got my bag. I love their Jane Austen tea series.

On Saturday, the fun started early at Locust Grove: dueling, archery, shuttlecock, and other activities ran throughout the day, including a Navy Encampment. There were workshops, such as how to tie a cravat, and my favorite afternoon tea. Four different Bingley Teas were available to choose from, along with Mini Hot Browns (a Kentucky specialty), scones, egg-salad sandwiches, and Benedictine sandwiches (also a Kentucky favorite). For dessert, we were able to choose from blackberry jam cake, lavender rum cake (amazing), bread pudding, and of course, Mr. Darcy’s lemon pound cake. The authors John Mullen (What Matters in Jane Austen) and Jo Baker (Longbourn) were guest speakers on Saturday, followed by a book signing.

The highlight of Saturday was trying to break the Guinness Book of World Records for the most people in Regency dress. Bath, England, held the record—409 people. Despite our efforts last year, we missed the mark by 50-plus people. But I’m happy to say we beat the record this year with around 491 people, who also walked in the Promenade. All of us who walked donated a dollar to the Jane Austen House, and JASNA Louisville is matching the donation. The day ended with a ball on Saturday night, which I am sorry to say, I could not attend.

On Sunday my mother and I were volunteers in the morning: checking people in for their teas and workshops. The navy Chaplin held services that morning, and later my cousin joined us for another tea! I can’t say no to tea!

Throughout the weekend there was shopping at the “Shoppe of Meryton.” Inside, Lydia Fast was selling her beautiful hats. (Lauren, my niece, bought one for her birthday last year and was wearing it with the riding habit she wore this year). A wig maker and a bookseller were present also.

They are hoping to put on the festival again next year. Right now they are trying to balance having the AGM next October and the festival next July. It’s a lot of work for Bonny to organize.

Below is a link to events held at this year’s Louisville festival:

http://jasnalouisville.com/festival-schedule

Also, here is a link to a blog that describes Lydia Fast’s beautiful hats:

http://thebohemianbelle1800.blogspot.com/2012/11/lydia-fast-regency-bonnet-workshop.html

 


 

The following pictures and legends from the Louisville Jane Austen Festival July 18-20 have been provided by JASNA StL member Mayme Bolt. Mayme attended the festival this year with her mother, Mary Raybourn, and her niece, Lauren Bolt. Thank you Mayme.  All photos copyright © Mayme Bolt.  All rights reserved.