JASNA StL News & Notes – August 2014

 

JASNA StL founding member Phyllis Thorpe recently passed along two links of interest to readers of Jane Austen.

The first: a link to a July 6 “Charlie Rose” conversation with John McQuillen, the curator of the Morgan Library’s current “Marks of Genius” exhibit. The interviewer is guest host Jon Meacham, whose favorite author, it turns out, is Miss Austen. (If you want to skip the political talk, however interesting, that precedes the interview with Mr. McQuillen, scroll to near the end of the program.)

http://www.charlierose.com/watch/60414985

The second: an article in the current issue of the Atlantic, “The Economics of Jane Austen” by Shannon Chamberlain, who discusses the influence Adam Smith may have had on Jane Austen’s views on money and morality. Interesting, to say the least.

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/08/the-economics-of-jane-austen/375486

 

Notes from our New York Colleagues

In addition to Phyllis’ correspondence, our New York colleagues Linda Dennery and Meg Levin passed along the following recently:

For the last three months, Sarah Emsley’s blog has been offering guests the chance to discuss Mansfield Park, Jane Austen’s third novel, which was published in 1814 and is the theme of this year’s JASNA AGM. Authors include Elaine Bander, Cheryl Kinney, Juliet McMaster, Sarah Seltzer and Juliette Wells. Go here to read the latest one and scroll down the page for earlier posts, beginning May 9: sarahemsley.

If you’re not familiar with W.H. Auden’s poem in which he feigns shock at how Jane Austen could “Reveal so frankly and with such sobriety/The Economic basis of society,” you can find the poem and the views of other famous authors on the following page: here.

The Jane Austen Centre in Bath has unveiled a new waxwork figure of Jane Austen, based on contemporary descriptions and the sketch by her sister Cassandra. Go here to view a video of how it was made: Wax Jane.

 


 

At Google: Director Amma Asante Talks about Her Movie Belle

 

Earlier this month (May 7) Google invited director Amma Asante to talk about her movie Belle. If you’ve seen the movie, the interview provides insight about Asante’s vision for the story. If you haven’t seen the movie, it’s still an interesting look at the creative process. Running time: about 50 minutes. Also, note Asante’s passing reference to a script (a treatment?) for a movie adaptation of Austen’s Lady Susan.

[cryout-button-color url=”http://www.jasna-stl.org/2014/05/19/assessing-belle/” color=”#47AFFF”]Read Our Regional Coordinator’s Assessment of Belle.[/cryout-button-color]

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CApscmt3XE0

Report on Mansfield Park Readings, presented March 29, 2014



On Saturday, March 29, 2014, St. Louis Region Janeites and guests from around the St. Louis area congregated at the Tavern of Fine Arts for lunch and readings of their favorite scenes from Mansfield Park.  As with our Pride and Prejudice event last year, The Tavern of Fine Arts offered a special cocktail for the occasion: “the Mansfield Park.”

James Heine, Rose Nester, Rhoda Richmond, Jennifer Darnell, Lynette McFarland, Miranda Miller, Andromeda Williams, and Shirley Bassett read selections from Mansfield Park.

Because Mansfield Park is one of the most controversial novels of Jane Austen, comments from her family and friends collected by Jane Austen were also read.  The readings themselves gave a glimpse into the world of Fanny Price, her cousins, visitors to the park, and her family in Portsmouth.

Some attendees brought their books and were willing to read a selection too, if time allowed.

Miranda Miller and Andromeda Williams attended in beautiful Regency costumes, adding greatly to their readings.  They also gave a description of how the costumes are made and the undergarments that are part of the costume.  It certainly gives one a new appreciation for what women wore during that time period, as compared to the freedom and ease of clothes today. It was later discovered their guest, Toya Huston, designed Andromeda’s costume.    

Everyone showed a great understanding of Mansfield Park with each of their readings.
Some comments:

“…a wonderful job of organizing the nice event today. I really enjoyed my first visit to the Tavern. My food was very good…  Service very nice… And, of course, the readings – I loved them, and I admire anyone who does public speaking. …the acoustics are good. The podium was charming.”



Jayme Blandford, a literature teacher from St. Charles Community College, was a first-time attendee and is excited to do more.  She is presenting a paper at the Popular Culture Association Conference in Chicago in April regarding the film Austenland.  The paper’s title is “Austenland: The Modern Janeite’s Fantasy Come to Film.”

    Many were interested in repeating this event for the 200th anniversary of the publication of Emma.

In preparation for the March meeting Sheila Hwang, a professor from Webster University, and Regional Coordinator Rose Nester were interviewed for the KDHX program “Literature for the Halibut,” which you can find at the following link:  http://kdhx.fm/archives/archive_gen.php?show=literatureforthehalibut .  The link will be available until April 7, 2014.

 

Austen lovers to celebrate 200th birthday of ‘Mansfield Park’

 

“The following appeared online at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch (www.stltoday.com) on St. Patrick’s Day. Jane Henderson is the book editor for the Post-Dispatch and writes about books and publishing at her “Book Blog.”

 

Readers from the local chapter of the Jane Austen Society of North America will gather March 29 at the Tavern of Fine Arts.

Last year the group had a good crowd for its celebration of “P&P.” But as member Jim Heine notes, Fanny Price is no Elizabeth Bennet:

“After being dazzled by the incandescent Elizabeth Bennet, encountering Fanny Price is something of a shock. Elizabeth is brilliant and witty; Fanny, reserved, reticent, occasionally fearful (with good reason), and even, at times, priggish. And as the nexus of the story, Mansfield Park itself is far different, for example, from Longbourn, Netherfield, Rosings, or Pemberley. You find no comic relief at Mansfield Park, as there is in the various homes of Pride and Prejudice—no Mrs. Bennet or Mr. Collins to laugh at, no Mary Bennet to amuse you, no incisive retorts to make you smile. Where Pride and Prejudice offers joy, Mansfield Park reminds the reader on almost every page that Fanny’s fate is held by people whose moral compasses are in doubt, and who seem bent on using Fanny to serve their selfish ends. It probably takes a second reading of Mansfield Park to appreciate Fanny’s character and plight, and to appreciate Austen’s construction of the novel.”

Toward the end of “Mansfield Park,” Fanny does receive some good news — which almost sends the meek one searching for a “cordial.” In honor of Fanny, the Tavern will create its own drink for the event.

In a press release, the JASNA chapter says

“JASNA members and friends will read favorite scenes from ‘Mansfield Park’, first published in London by Thomas Egerton on May 9, 1814, and offer insights on its themes and relevance for today. For more information, e-mail or call Rose Marie Nester, JASNA St. Louis regional coordinator, at 104voce@att.net or 314-752-3752. Lunch will be available after 11 a.m. and throughout the afternoon from the Tavern of Fine Arts menu. The event is free and open to the public.”

The event is from 1-3 p.m. March 29. The Tavern of Fine Arts is at 313 Belt Avenue.

 


Jane Henderson is book editor of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Follow her online at stltoday.com/books and on Twitter @stlbooks.

http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/books-and-literature/book-blog/austen-lovers-to-celebrate-th-birthday-of-mansfield-park/article_a6249ac3-fab0-5013-ab27-49425ab2f93d.html


 

JASNA Clippings

 

The following are among the links we’ve received from Kerri Spennicchia the past few weeks:


 

 

• “Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice: Six Things You Never Knew” (Anna Moeslein, Glamour.com)

• “Written in Threads”: Austen-inspired dresses at Belsay Hall (Nicole Robo)

• “Seven Jane Austen-Inspired Items You Can Wear without Looking Crazy” (Candace Bryan, Styleite.com)

• “Fear of Jane Austen” (Rebecca Mead, The New Yorker)

• “Jane, Plain No More: A Year of Austen Glamour” (Mary Jo Murphy and Jennifer Schluessler, The New York Times—includes an Austen-related quiz)

Longbourn by Jo Baker, review by Holly Kyte, The Telegraph

• “How BBC Executives Initially Rejected Colin Firth for the Role of Mr. Darcy” (Simon Cable, The Daily Mail)

• “Sansoucie Wins Honor in Jane Austen Essay Contest” (Missourian.com):

 

Finally, also from Kerri, a YouTube link she purloined from the Jane Austen Centre’s summer newsletter. It’s a recap of Emma Thompson’s 1995 acceptance speech at the Golden Globe awards, for her Sense and Sensibility screenplay.

 

Jane on the Ten Pound Note

 

2017 Ten Pound Note featuring Jane Austen

2017 Ten Pound Note featuring Jane Austen

 

 

From our colleagues Linda Dennery and Meg Levin of JASNA’s New York Region, an update on a story that’s been percolating for several weeks. Apparently, we’ll need to wait a few years before we all acquire Jane Austen 10-pound notes:

http://www.csmonitor.com/Books/chapter-and-verse/2013/0725/Jane-Austen-will-be-the-face-of-the-10-pound-note-in-the-UK

 

 

 

Also from our New York Region, on the same topic:

 

Why that Jane Austen quotation on the new £10 note is a major blunder

Duplicated many million times on the new £10 banknote will be a line in praise of reading – it’s a shame it was uttered by an Austen character who had no genuine interest in reading at all:  www.guardian.co.uk/business/shortcuts/2013/jul/25/jane-austen-quotation-10-note

 

Jane Austen Bank Note Earns Huzzahs and Nitpicking

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/07/26/jane-austen-bank-note-earns-huzzahs-and-nitpicking

 

Austen on Money

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/28/opinion/sunday/austen-on-money.html?emc=edit_tnt_20130727&tntemail0=y