JASNA StL News & Notes – August 2014

 

JASNA StL founding member Phyllis Thorpe recently passed along two links of interest to readers of Jane Austen.

The first: a link to a July 6 “Charlie Rose” conversation with John McQuillen, the curator of the Morgan Library’s current “Marks of Genius” exhibit. The interviewer is guest host Jon Meacham, whose favorite author, it turns out, is Miss Austen. (If you want to skip the political talk, however interesting, that precedes the interview with Mr. McQuillen, scroll to near the end of the program.)

http://www.charlierose.com/watch/60414985

The second: an article in the current issue of the Atlantic, “The Economics of Jane Austen” by Shannon Chamberlain, who discusses the influence Adam Smith may have had on Jane Austen’s views on money and morality. Interesting, to say the least.

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/08/the-economics-of-jane-austen/375486

 

Notes from our New York Colleagues

In addition to Phyllis’ correspondence, our New York colleagues Linda Dennery and Meg Levin passed along the following recently:

For the last three months, Sarah Emsley’s blog has been offering guests the chance to discuss Mansfield Park, Jane Austen’s third novel, which was published in 1814 and is the theme of this year’s JASNA AGM. Authors include Elaine Bander, Cheryl Kinney, Juliet McMaster, Sarah Seltzer and Juliette Wells. Go here to read the latest one and scroll down the page for earlier posts, beginning May 9: sarahemsley.

If you’re not familiar with W.H. Auden’s poem in which he feigns shock at how Jane Austen could “Reveal so frankly and with such sobriety/The Economic basis of society,” you can find the poem and the views of other famous authors on the following page: here.

The Jane Austen Centre in Bath has unveiled a new waxwork figure of Jane Austen, based on contemporary descriptions and the sketch by her sister Cassandra. Go here to view a video of how it was made: Wax Jane.

 


 

At Google: Director Amma Asante Talks about Her Movie Belle

 

Earlier this month (May 7) Google invited director Amma Asante to talk about her movie Belle. If you’ve seen the movie, the interview provides insight about Asante’s vision for the story. If you haven’t seen the movie, it’s still an interesting look at the creative process. Running time: about 50 minutes. Also, note Asante’s passing reference to a script (a treatment?) for a movie adaptation of Austen’s Lady Susan.

[cryout-button-color url=”http://www.jasna-stl.org/2014/05/19/assessing-belle/” color=”#47AFFF”]Read Our Regional Coordinator’s Assessment of Belle.[/cryout-button-color]

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CApscmt3XE0

The Modern Woman: How Jane Austen and the Bronte Sisters Revolutionized Femimism



Earlier this year, Johanna Hill, a University City eighth-grader, prepared a National History Day (www.nhd.org) video about Jane Austen and the Brontë sisters. As part of her project, Johanna interviewed JASNA-StL member and Saint Louis University professor of English Toby Benis. Johanna has graciously allowed us to post a link to her video (below). Congratulations, Johanna, on a successful project.

 

Here is Johanna’s introduction to her National History Day (NHD) video:

“I started reading Jane Austen’s Emma about a year ago. It was my first ‘classic’ piece of literature, and I was expecting it to be tedious and dry. I was incredibly wrong. Miss Woodhouse, Harriet, and Mr. Churchill swept me into their world, and I became one with the story, gasping at each betrayal and cheering at every triumph. Jane Austen was my obsession, and I gobbled up her novels like a lunatic. This appetite was still occurring when my teacher, Mrs. Bakeman, handed me the packet with the NHD theme for the year: Turning points in history. It was tough to decide, but I finally chose to create a project about Austen’s interpretation of women, which I always admired because they were so smart and independent. To build on that, I also decided to include the Brontë sisters, another group of important women authors in roughly the same time period.”

 









Austen and Game Theory? She was ahead of her time says UCLA Professor

 

Our New York region colleague Kerri Spennicchia regularly passes along links that readers of Jane Austen might find interesting. This past week, a new book by Michael Chwe, a political-science professor at UCLA, has been garnering headlines. Here, courtesy of  Spennicchia, are three links that highlight Chwe’s  Jane Austen, Game Theorist.

 

The first is from UCLA. It includes both a five-minute video summary as well as a full lecture presentation of Chwe’s thesis.  The second is from Slate, and the third is a tongue-in-cheek response to Chwe’s observations by Ferris Jabr.

 

Pride, prejudice and strategic thinking: Jane Austen wrote the book ..

Professor Chwe’s Lecture Presentation:

Pride, prejudice and strategic thinking: Jane Austen wrote the book on game theory

“Austen’s novels are game theory textbooks,” Michael Suk-Young Chwe writes in “Jane Austen, Game Theorist,” which Princeton University Press published April 21. “She’s trying to get readers to use their higher thinking skills and to think strategically.”

Read Further

 

 

Political Scientist Realizes Jane Austen Knew Something About Human Relationships

[Slate]
Readers of Jane Austen had reason to rejoice this morning. According to an article in today’s New York Times, we haven’t just been wasting our time on frivolous little stories. Austen, it seems, has something to tell us. And not only us English majors. Mathematicians. Game theorists. Serious thinkers. Even Henry Kissinger.

…Read Further

 

Jane Austen Responds: Game Theory? Sir, You Flatter Me

[Scientific American (blog)]
It is with a mix of delight, embarrassment and confusion that I have watched people analyze and adapt my novels all these years. Cassandra often hears of the latest developments before I do and takes great pleasure in bringing me tidbits of gossip

… Read Further

 

Pride & Prejudice on the Today Show

In honor of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice’s 200th Anniversary, NBC’s Today Show aired a very nice piece on Jane, marriage, and her time to which she lived.

Enjoy!

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