9th Annual Jane Austen Festival – Louisville


The Jane Austen Society of North America- Greater Louisville Region is already hard at work on the 9th Annual Jane Austen Festival, which will be held at 1790’s Locust Grove in Louisville, Kentucky.

This year, we will be celebrating “Jane Austen’s Legacy, 1775-1817,” and commemorating 200 years since her passing.  Join us on Friday, July 14th, Saturday, July 15th, and Sunday, July 16th!


On Friday, July 14th, the hours are 6-9 p.m. and we will have two special people in attendance: Emperor Napoleon and Admiral Lord Nelson! What will they say to each other? Watch our website for more details and scheduling.

How fortunate that July 14th is Bastille Day! Come dressed in your Costume Parisienne finery and enjoy foods from a food truck that makes crepes! All of our Vendor shoppes will be open for business for Twilight Shopping- come for early deals!


On Saturday & Sunday, July 15th & 16th, the hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. each day. Our featured speaker is Dr. Cheryl Kinney and she will be presenting, “The Eulogy Jane Austen Should Have Had.” We will also have the ever popular Regency Style Show by Betsy Bashore, the Regency Fashion Display by Gayle Simmons, and a NEW Punch & Judy Show. The Acasta Naval Encampment will be back and more!

The Vendor shoppes will be open for business each day. We will have food available for purchase at the Earl of Sandwich Shoppe, which will be in a new location this year. Plus our Four-Course Afternoon Tea sittings with a special Children’s Tea on Sunday afternoon!

Our 2017 Workshops include making Tussie Mussies, String your own strand of Pearls, Regency Letter Writing, and Netting.

The Grand Ball will be on Saturday, July 15th, 7:30-10:30 p.m. at Spalding University.


 

 

On Saturday, July 15th, we will have a Regency Mourning Procession in honor of the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen’s passing. More details on proper female and male dress to come later.  In the meantime, check out this Pinterest Board on Mourning Attire. 


Need a place to stay? Go to our website for information about hotels, B&B’s and more. There is a huge music festival the same weekend, we suggest making reservationssooner rather than later.


 

Online advance registration will begin on or about June 5th. Advance registration is highly recommended for the

Afternoon Tea, Workshops and the Grand Ball

as they sell-out before the festival opens.

Festival Admission is $6 per person for Friday Night-Twilight Shopping and $12 per person for one-day admission on Saturday or Sunday. Children under 12 admitted free with an adult.

NOTE: A two-day admission pass for $20 per person will be available ONLINE ONLY.

The Four-Course Afternoon Tea is $25 (plus Festival admission) per person and Children’s Tea is $20 per child (plus Festival admission if over 12 years of age). The Grand Ball is $25 per person. Workshop prices will be available April 2017.


We hope to see you at Locust Grove this July!


In Memoriam


 

Our national organization reports, via the UK’s Telegraph newspaper, that Austen fans have lost another author and long-time advocate of Jane Austen. Marie Dobbs made an interesting life for herself and penned other works besides her 1975 completion of Sanditon, as her Telegraph obituary indicates:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/11790472/Marie-Dobbs-author-obituary.html

Last month, the Telegraph also marked the passing of Austen scholar Irene Collins, perhaps best known for her book, Jane Austen and the Clergy (1994):

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/11753737/Irene-Collins-historian-obituary.html

Some years ago, Jane Austen and the Clergy was the topic at one of our summer luncheon meetings, held that year at the Chatillon-DeMenil House.

 

Revisiting the A&E/BBC’s 1995 P&P

Finally, on a lighter note, if you need an excuse to skip over to England in the next few weeks, here is the perfect reason for making the trip, courtesy of the Basingstoke Gazette:

http://www.basingstokegazette.co.uk/leisure/general/13582167.Selected_cast_and_director_of_1995_BBC_Pride_and_Prejudice_to_attend_Chawton_conference/?ref=fbshr

For more information about the the library’s Sept. 5 presentation, “BBC Pride and Prejudice 1995: Reflections Around a Much-Loved Production,”  visit the Chawton House Library’s website,

www.chawtonhouse.org, or simply click on this link for a program agenda: www.chawtonhouse.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/ProgrammePP3.pdf

Among the presenters Sept. 5, our own Devoney Looser (a.k.a., Stone Cold Jane Austen, www.devoneylooser.com/roller-derby.html). Now with Arizona State University, Devoney’s topic will be “Playing Mr. Darcy, from Archery to Wet Shirts.”

Also, you may recall that Chawton House Library founder Sandy Lerner was our 2012 Birthday Luncheon guest.

And speaking of topics, this is a good time to remind everyone that our next JASNA Metropolitan St. Louis Region meeting is Sept. 26 at the University City Public Library. Dr. Toby Benis, of Saint Louis University’s College of Arts and Sciences and a fellow region member, will speak on “Jane Austen’s Portsmouth.” The 2 p.m. presentation is open to the public; so please invite your family and friends. The library is located at 6701 Delmar Blvd., University City, Mo. We’ll see you then.

 

 

Kara Louise: How She Came to Writing and Jane Austen and Where It Led


Kara Louise's novel Darcy's Voyage - program presentation at Jane Austen Society in St. Louis

Darcy’s Voyage – Kara Louise

On June 6, members of the St. Louis Region of JASNA and their guests congregated at the lovely home of member Bettye Dew to enjoy one of her delectable luncheons and then a delightful presentation by author Kara Louise. Ms. Louise (her pen name) recounted the story of her exploration of writing; from one line in fourth grade (as a reaction to a painting) to three pages of a story many years later to three chapters inspired by genealogy research even later. That was where it seemed to end.

Then in 2001 she discovered the writings of Jane Austen. Through the six-hour miniseries and the novel of Pride and Prejudice, Louise was finally inspired to really write. Soon she was reading the Penguin edition of Pride and Prejudice and reading more of Austen’s novels and watching the accompanying films. She also discovered online the many Pride and Prejudice sequels (of course, not by Austen).

Kara Louise also researched online sites and decided to write, not sequels, but as she calls them, variations on Pride and Prejudice. She is fascinated with the characters and wants to write stories from their points of view and to put them in different situations.

This has led to several Darcy and Elizabeth stories, several which begin with Elizabeth’s refusal of Darcy’s proposal during their meeting at Rosings. She states that her books have no order or sequence, instead they are independent stories. In Darcy’s Voyage the two meet crossing the ocean. That was inspired by the story of the Jeanie Johnston (a ship famous for no loss of lives in its voyages) and Two Years before the Mast by Richard Henry Dana, Jr. That research also inspired Pirates and Prejudice.

Even so, some research can lead to dead ends or closed doors, as when Kara Louise wanted to use deafness and sign language in a story but found that sign language had not yet been invented in England during the time period of her novel. This has not deterred Kara Louise who has used Pride and Prejudice: An Annotated Edition, Patricia Meyer Spacks, editor, and the novels of Georgette Heyer for further research. These have inspired stories involving other characters of Austen’s such as Anne de Bourgh and Harriet Smith.

What is ahead for Kara Louise? Well, she is certainly far from finished.   She has started an Emma – inspired story revolving around Harriet Smith and is very interested in one based on Persuasion. All this interested attendees who had read some of her novels while others were ready to do so. One such attendee, a librarian, could not believe she had no titles by Kara Louise at her library and was sure to remedy that situation.

Kara Louise shared several of her favorite research sites with attendees. And who knows, some may have suddenly become bitten by the writing bug. After all, as she pointed out, information leads to inspiration.

Kara Louise’s novels are mostly self-published with two that were picked up by Source books. You can find them at her website: http://www.karalouise.net/

 


 

JASNA StL News & Notes – August 2014

 

JASNA StL founding member Phyllis Thorpe recently passed along two links of interest to readers of Jane Austen.

The first: a link to a July 6 “Charlie Rose” conversation with John McQuillen, the curator of the Morgan Library’s current “Marks of Genius” exhibit. The interviewer is guest host Jon Meacham, whose favorite author, it turns out, is Miss Austen. (If you want to skip the political talk, however interesting, that precedes the interview with Mr. McQuillen, scroll to near the end of the program.)

http://www.charlierose.com/watch/60414985

The second: an article in the current issue of the Atlantic, “The Economics of Jane Austen” by Shannon Chamberlain, who discusses the influence Adam Smith may have had on Jane Austen’s views on money and morality. Interesting, to say the least.

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/08/the-economics-of-jane-austen/375486

 

Notes from our New York Colleagues

In addition to Phyllis’ correspondence, our New York colleagues Linda Dennery and Meg Levin passed along the following recently:

For the last three months, Sarah Emsley’s blog has been offering guests the chance to discuss Mansfield Park, Jane Austen’s third novel, which was published in 1814 and is the theme of this year’s JASNA AGM. Authors include Elaine Bander, Cheryl Kinney, Juliet McMaster, Sarah Seltzer and Juliette Wells. Go here to read the latest one and scroll down the page for earlier posts, beginning May 9: sarahemsley.

If you’re not familiar with W.H. Auden’s poem in which he feigns shock at how Jane Austen could “Reveal so frankly and with such sobriety/The Economic basis of society,” you can find the poem and the views of other famous authors on the following page: here.

The Jane Austen Centre in Bath has unveiled a new waxwork figure of Jane Austen, based on contemporary descriptions and the sketch by her sister Cassandra. Go here to view a video of how it was made: Wax Jane.

 


 

Miss Manners Channels Miss Austen

 
In today’s St. Louis Post-Dispatch (June 24), Miss Manners (a.k.a. Judith Martin), our favorite advice-giver, tackles the tricky question of courtship now and then (the Regency era, of course). We offer a link to Miss Manners’ observations in the hope that they will put a smile on your face, as they did ours:

http://www.stltoday.com/lifestyles/relationships-and-special-occasions/columns/miss-manners/courtship-took-a-long-time-in-jane-austen-s-day/article_14c06029-0800-5a26-ae66-3f3fbf6bc31e.html

We wonder if anyone has considered inviting Miss Manners to an AGM. Were she to accept, of course, we would all have to be on our very best behavior. Indeed.

A Will, an Opportunity for Study, and a Proposal

 

Last week, Linda Dennery and Meg Levin, our faithful New York Region correspondents, passed along three Austen-related items. The first is a story about, and a link to, Austen’s will; the second, an announcement of a summer course on Mansfield Park and Persuasion at Cornell University; and the third, a real-life marriage proposal with an Austen theme.

While Dennery and Levin caution that you might need a subscription to the Mail Online’s website to read the newspaper story, we had no trouble accessing the link without said subscription. Your experience may differ, of course. As an alternate source, Dennery and Levin have provided a link to the UK’s National Archive, which posted Austen’s will online on Epiphany (Jan. 6).

Of interest in the story is the note by the Mail’s reporter that Austen’s estate, valued at some £800 at her death, would be worth about £27,000, or approx. $45,000, today.

At Cornell, senior lecturer David Faulkner’s July 6–12 adult-education course, “Half Agony Half Hope: Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park and Persuasion,” explores the “radically vulnerable” positions in which Fanny and Anne find themselves, not only bereft of parental care and protection, but also, essentially, homeless and in search of identity in a hostile world.

Of the third item supplied by Dennery and Levin, we will say … well, we’ll let you peruse it yourself.